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laws and you've advocated for that as well. >> changing the? >> drug laws. the >> has come since 1989 of advocated legalizing marijuana, controller cannot regulate, tax it. we had a tipping point with regard to marijuana and legalizing it. i think that colorado is going to do that. it's on the ballot in colorado this november, regulate marijuana like alcohol. i think it is going to pass. when it passes and if it doesn't pass the colorado come is going to pass the 50% of americans now say they support the motion. it is a growing number. it's a growing number because people are talking about the issue more than they ever have before, recognizing 90% of the drug problem is prohibition repeated, not use related. that is not to discount the problems of use and abuse, but that should be the focus. i think when we legalize marijuana were going to take giant steps forward regarding all other drugs and that is going to be starting with looking at the drug issue first as a health issue rather than a criminal justice issue. >> let's get the police that on the streets enforcing real crime. the th
law school in three parts of yale law school on the supreme court for corporately no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and this was, you know, supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same. but just as on the other side of first street, the united states congress is deeply divided, according to party, so was the united states supreme court. and this is a moment of real partisan division at the supreme court. and that is exemplified in case
of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have a standing at one its jurisdiction. that's another thing the court basically made up. other courts won't necessarily have that. a few years ago to give very interesting kind of judicial trip to south africa which is a fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african constitution gives people all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no limitation on jurisdiction. somebody can come into court and say the constitution promises me a job a
that gap. there are six product of harvard law school and three products at yale on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think actually. but those are i hope interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly i don't think that they are very important. here is an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer. but this is basically all you need to know. if there is a takeaway i've gotten to the point earlier there are five republicans and four democrats and that tells you much of what you need to know. it is true the justices where the roads because they are supposed to look alike and it's supposed to give the perception that they are all pretty much the same. but just as the united states congress is a deeply divided according to the party, so is the united states supreme court, and this is a moment of partisan division at the supreme court, and of that is exemplified in case after case. why this is of impo
of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and communications director. duval patrick is the governor of massachusetts. grover norquist. it's like groundhog day every side -- every five years before us identify our class. we have the only two conservatives the gun and of harvard. the rest of us just throw things at us. it's always amusing commute the series is very good. come back in november bummer doing when it -- william henry harrison. it's a very short program. you don't want to miss that one. and such a presidential merit i visited his tomb. his tomb is in a small town along the ohio river in southeastern ohio commanders as an eternal flame which may have been up for dec
signing statements, which i thought he was saying he did not have to obey the law, but what happened was, there was a legitimate, strong argument being made by the president's supporters in favor of why the president had the use statements to distance himself from legislation. there were also very strong arguments by people like me who says that that is unconstitutional. the american bar association appointed a task force to look into these findings and i was a member of that task force, and then the president of the aba and i testified before a house committee and, guess what? even though a good face was being made for the president to issue and sign the statements, not one single democrat, not one saw any merit in his argument. even though i thought and a lot of other people thought that what the president was doing was clearly unconstitutional, the president saying i don't have to obey the law that i just time, not one republican done anything wrong with it. on issue after issue, foreign policy or anything else, we divide into these parties. first of all, there is nothing in the const
, present and future of the nest its constitution. professor of law and political science at university. he teaches constitutional law at the college and law school. he received his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor of the yale law journal. clerking for steven briar, he joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor is co-editor of the leading constitutional law casebook, processes of the constitutional decision making and is the author of several of the books including the constitution in criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution and was really america's and written constitution, the precedents and principles will apply. the hon. clarence thomas has served as a justice of the supreme court for nearly 21 years. he attended seminary and received an ab from the college of the holy cross and j.d. from yale law school. serve as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of
all the decisions about their salaries, benefits, work worlds and they have laws and regulations that govern themselves. and if these politicians don't perform guess what? they throw them out and put their money behind somebody else. these unions will do anything in their power to elect politicians who will serve their interests. they will spend hundreds of millions of dollars, even billions of their members dues on politics. they will send an political and political ground troops which they will include paid volunteers to get out the vote. they will form alliances and donate to leftist organizations who will support a pro-union agenda or go money flows my friends from government employee unions to politicians back to the same unions in a never-ending cycle of greed and corruption. politicians know that union money will cycle back to them in return for their pro-union votes and if they cross those unions, the unions will throw them right out of office. unions reward their friends and punish their enemies very effectively. and the amount of money they can bring to bear as neighbor
make about the same. first year associates in law firms make about the same. the women on average choose to work fewer hours than men. full-time is about 35 hours a week. and women work about. many women go in and out of the work force as they have children. and that on average reduces their average earnings. but it doesn't mean they're discriminated against. it doesn't mean that if you take two women and two men in the same job they don't end the same. they do. >> what is the paycheck fairness act, do you think it's necessary. >> the paycheck fairness act was up again voting in congress. it failed. there was a failed when -- it would require firms to report to the government the women they have on their payroll, the men they have on the payroll, how much they pay both groups, that's an attempt of the government to troy to equalize pay between groups of men and women. rather than as the law holds right now men and women in the come rabble job. they try to set equal pay for equal. which are two different things. there's no reason why groups of women and groups of men in the same fi
. >> primarily senator old ridge was the only one not a banker. he was spearheading. >> the father-in-law to john rockefeller. >> he is tied in closely with the banking industry and the industrial complex. a wealthy guy in his own right. probably the most political figure in the united states short of the president who was wood row will sob in those days. the rest guys are bankers and they represented the din city of jpmorgan and the rockefeller dynasty. they had connections. they were connectioned to the roth childs in england. and max there. there was. he had connections to the brother max who was the head of the banks that banking consortium in germany and the nether land. we have a international group here, really. representing international people. and it was the e peed my of the bad bankers of the world theeps were quites. what happened is they knew that there was going to be a move to control banking. they knew that congress was going to pass some kind of haw to regulate banking. instead of being stupid and sitting back and saying i hope they don't too bad. they decided to take the lead. t
that has become a hobby of mine and will be the brunt of a course in the fall in harvard law school is every student particularly at our so-called elite was schools which would lead students graduates to believe there's only one constitution in the entire united states to realize federal defaults that each stage has the constitution and one discovers contrary to the bad recruit at stake constitutions have, and remarkably interesting. and without exception more democratic than the united states constitution. there's a controversy among political scientists about the degree to which the united states constitution is continuing to serve as a model, what i find much more telling is the united states constitution, a remarkable and relatively non examined degree did not serve as a model for the state constitutions that were drafted in this country beginning around the turn of the nineteenth century. if you look at various new york constitutions and other constitutions you find dramatic differences. the new york constitution of 1846 for better or worse and when talking about constitutional
this matrix of election laws and systems and regulations shape who gets elected and the policy in the country and they determine or shape the level of mercury in the air that we brief, how many kids are in a classroom in the city of detroit, so they have a huge impact the we don't always appreciate. >> explain how that matrix works. where do they start and how far do they go? >> one unique thing about the united states is that we don't have a central system in terms of the election. we have got over 4,000 difrent election systems and the of different rules and laws and people who administer them said there isn't like one puppet master like some grand conspiracy. we've got all these different systems and the people that are familiar with the most common example of this which would be gerrymandering where politicians draw districts that favor them. congress is about a 14 or 15% approval rating or maybe even lower than that. yet 85% of members of congress are safe because they have drawn their districts or state legislatures have drawn their districts so that those members are safe so that is th
. mississippi paid 11% of the poverty line, but legally obligated to get under federal law to make welfare available to people who came and applied for it. what's happened? well, let me tell you what's happened in this recession. it's really astone -- astonishing. food stamps was at 26 million people in 2007, 26.3 million. in the last five years, that's gone up to 46 million people. in other words, food stamps works. that's why mrs. gingrich called president obama the food stamp president because we had a program working to help people in the recession. he is the food stamp president, that's great. although, and food stamps were raised in the recovery act, the stimulus legislation, and that was a very, very good thing. now, why did they go up? because people had a legal right to get that when they went into the office to apply, had to be done. welfare, now temporary assistance for needy families, tanf, no longer a legal right. go in, you look healthy, you look like you can work, they can say whatever they want, there'si no obligation to do that. in the recession, tanf went up from 3.9 mill
-year associates and law firms make about the same. but women on average choose to work fewer hours than men, even when they work full-time. full-time is anything about 35 hours a week. women work about 12% fewer hours. about 25% work in and out of the workforce as they have children. that, on average, would beat the average earnings. but it doesn't mean that they are discriminated against or that if you take two women and two men in the same job, they don't match up. >> host: what is the paycheck fairness act? >> guest: the paycheck fairness act failed. it also failed when there was a democratic house, senate, and president. barack obama himself said that it would require us to report to the government, the women they have on the payroll, the men they have on the payroll, how much they paid those groups, and that is an attempt of the government to try to equalize pay between groups of women and groups of men. rather than, as well all holds right now, men and women in comparable jobs in the same jobs. so what they are trying to do is have people pay for equal work, not equal pay to equal work, whi
'm a democrat with islamic preference and at the same time trying to promote rule of law within the country to work against corruption and transparency and respecting the constitution and the laws that were implemented and being very successful on the economic side. no one today is talking about islamists implementing cheri. .. >> what we face in the west now, we know this as citizens. i live in euro, you live in the united states of america, and we know the problem with the democracies now is not the dogmatic decisions of religions, but some decisions of frans national cooperation and economy power deciding without being able to say anything and we cull it democracy, still today dealing with power that are beyond the procedure. the banks, transnational cooperation, and, for example, in greece, in spain, in italy, we have those coming to solve the problem we never elected them, but money is choosing them. we have to deal with not simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from states, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on to the state which is also imposing
now of the right is because of a law for the greece, under greek law, whatever party comes in first, i will take a step back. it has proportional representation. that the reserves a rule of comment. you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that write the law. 18% of the people while party a, and it will come to deciding what laws get passed. they will effectively screwed that in which you would think of the idea. in european countries, we have torsional representation. you get a cut off of 5%. that is how many seats that you get. if you get 51% of the vote, you get it all and the 49% worked. by the way, we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past, and even have it now. when you read about a primary and the vote in some states, and candidate a gets another delegate conventions, that is a proportional representation and they get an equal number of delegates than what they got out of the vote. we actually recognize in the united states proportional representation, we just don't allow these days. one of the reasons for that, if i can be allo
. not all of them, but found that i have heard speak because politics has changed the law in the last even 30 years, where now the media and people who are running everything is so polarized and i feel like another kind of that divide also created is a lot of people like if you're into business, you're dramatically like a republican or something like that. or if you are not into business, then you're just completely to the other side. i feel that you shouldn't have to be like that. if you want to start your own business, you can be a democrat, whatever. there's just a lot of unneeded social pressure in that aspect. >> god bless the american businessman. i am for the henry ford who at their own money built up a producing company and by the way doubled the pay of the workers because it occurred to him, hey, maybe it's my own workers can afford to buy the product they make, i will make my products. a lot of people laugh over engine charlie wilson who is the secretary of defense under eisenhower. they always mangled the quote. they say what is good for general motors is good for america. now,
know, martin luther king said the moral law of the universe bends slowly, but it bends towards justice. eng there was a bending towards justice. there are things wrong with the health care bill, but you know what johnson would have said? he said that about the civil rights bill, a flawed bill. he said the important thing is to pass it. once you pass it, it's easy to go back and fix it. >> host: next caller from georgia. good morning to you. >> caller: good morning. thank you for the distinguished work for us all. >> guest: thank you. >> caller: yes. i wonder if you came across things in your research that suggested president johnson experienced moral compunction about the behavior at some point. it's striking he's so on the spot with the angels with civil rights and other important issues, but so unscrupulous in accomplishing those wonderful goalsment thank you. >> guest: well, that's another really terrific question. you are talking about ends and means. the ends is noble. medicare, lyndon johnson said it's the job of government to take care of the bent and the ill. the bent means the
was he at the nuts and bolts of law, the procedures and corporate procedures. >> she was very good at picking juries. he was a great judge of human nature. he was very good at cross-examination, but he was awful at the technical part of the law, and he would pick up in his famous case, arthur garfield hayes was the attorney for the american civil liberties union. the judge would say, all right. we're going to have an argument on that point of law. parents to you want to come back into my office. leyritz was sick, no, let arthur and of that. i don't do that. earlier in his career, i don't know how many of you had to read but the author was an attorney. he became the legal partner. most of the legal brief writing, when they had to go into the appeals court was done by masters. there is a whole chapter about their very famous falling got and the incredible spite they had for each other for the rest of their lives. they were both very greedy, womanizers, and both convinced that they were literary men thrown into the wrong profession and what they really needed was peace and quiet that
of the obstacles that you faced. more women than men are in law school and medical schools now and so, when that'll elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, it's really an older notion at this point and i think it distances her from the younger audiences. so i don't think it's a good idea for women candidates to keep describing the obstacles they face in how unique they are, because we tend to resist voting for somebody who is the first of anything because it seems scary and probably not a good idea because we have never done it before. i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues or feminist issues. i think all the women in the book really didn't run as women. there is a book called running as a woman and i can't remember the first name now but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress out in colorado, somebody asked her, you plan his running as a woman and her response was do i have another option? [laughter] obviously we have never had a woman president so i don't think you need to make a point
and build your wings on the way down. the law bistro the case look-alike time capsule. newer winners flashing signs of cash. raiders have knowledge but one week ago with the superintendent anabel garza to a good guidance counselor side. what to we need to make this presentable? money. anabel garza went to a trip to ikea and went to pick up trash thinking the of the principles are not doing this right now. [laughter] acid did not have their younger sisters moving yen to take care of her daughter most night she was out talking to missionaries to have a school improvements facilitator in making mental list of who was missing books, desks and who was just missing. what is the drama? can i give you the short version the assistant principal asked concerning as science teachers largess. somebody suggested confiscating all the furniture from the site and swing. learning happens in many different ways. the something this silly could get out of hand the pressure everybody was under. science teachers especially. anabel garza looked at the ceiling. she knew mr. kaiser was yon had time and energy
what happened. hamas has closed opinions about many issues like sharia law, is real, united states, they could walk together to find a way. i do not want to an ex the baidu think they should be connected to jordan and egypt. it cannot happen tomorrow. we will have to wait. two years ago we would have told to the president would be caged in jail in cairo you would think i am in st.. today tell you the long term should be the linkage between the palestinians and jordan and those in the gaza with egypt. things change repast we have to put forward what we think is best. >> i see that as dangerous and there is also a moral issue. thank you will. >> i was in jerusalem 1973 when the war broke out as 71 not send weapons to the middle east because we do not want to encourage the war that has just guarded which sounded noble but at the same time they were sending weapons to the syrians and egyptians. my concern is with the fiery and gets the atomic bomb unquestioned is not that the egyptians will say we want the same toy but the point* is the egyptians or suni this garcetti arabia are suni i
] >> well, the first constitution is so different from ours. underwritten, accumulation of laws and traditions. their subjects of the queen. that is what, you know, the term is. >> i need to ask, asking questions just temporarily, please stick around for more questions from the audience. c-span will be here shortly to continue. there will be taking questions year from that history and biography pavilion and also from national colors. please stay with us. we would love to have you continue. and if you have questions, we will be back with you in it slightly less than ten minutes. thanks so much for your patients. please stay with us, and please thank our author >> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type the author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page and click search. you can also share anything you see on booktv.org easily by clicking share on the upper left side of the page and selecting the format. booktv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend with top nonfiction books and authors. booktv.org. >> quickly, sal
. the first year associates and law firms make about the same but women on average choose to work fewer hours than men. even when they work full time because you know full time is anything above 35 hours a week. women work about 12% fewer hours. about 25% of women work part-time. many women go in and out of the workforce if they have children and that on average is their average earnings but it doesn't mean they are discriminated against. it doesn't mean that if you take two women into men in the same job they don't earn the same. they do. >> what is the paycheck fairness act and do you think it's necessary? >> the paycheck fairness act just was up again for a vote in congress. it failed. is also failed when there is a demographic -- democratic house, and senate. that is because it would require them to report to the government that women they have on their payroll, the men they have on their payroll and how much they paid those groups and that attempted to equalize pay between groups of women in groups of men rather than as both wall holds right now men and women in comparable jobs come in t
talking about their legal rights and i am sure there are some law students in the room. when you read the book and the legal documents about the declaration, you understand about legal advice and international, finding, legal rights to jews and the rights to the land. i call this the common sense rights. [inaudible] this side was aggressive and started the war in and saying, you know, above my land back, -- even in the united states, nobody comes and tells you that we want our land back after we lost the war. the common sense rights should be something that should be said straightly. it enables us to espouse another role. [inaudible] if you lose, you lose. i've been talking about the rights about something very important, many times because of the pressure, coming from washington and the u.s., we tend not to speak about what belongs to us and what we believe, and i chose the name of the book "isreal: the will to prevail" because i think it is all about us. if we have the will to live, the will and the courage of the nation, we would be able to prevail. if we would try to satisfy every
of law, protection of property, and a wonderful society that spins off innovation. >> host: michael, do you foresee china becoming the world's largest economy, and is that a bad thing? >> guest: it's not a bad thing for china to become the world's largest economy, and if things go well in china as they may or may not, that probably happens in the next decade or two, but bear in mind that china has so many people that the per capita income in china will still be far lower than our per capita income. moreover, even when china has the world's largest economy, that does not make them the world leader and enable them to do the things the united states does for the world. the reason we wrote the book, "that used to be us" because we believe the american global role is not just unique, but in most ways at most times uniquely value l. it helps us, and it helps the whole world. the world would be a less peaceful place without the exansive role, but in order to continue to play that role, we have to meet the four challenges that we outline in the book. all of which is to say, among other things,
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26